November 4, 2011

Coming to Amerikay

Patrick O'Conner was born about 1805 in Ireland he married Bridget McNamara sometime before 1830.  Their first child was a daughter named Anne.  She was born before 1830.  She is my great great grandmother.  Anne had at least 5 siblings 4 of whom were born in Ireland.  Edward was born about 1836, Bridget 1837, Patrick 1840, and Alexander in 1846 all in Ireland.  Lastly, Mary was born in 1849 in  Vermont.  This puts the time of immigration between 1846 and 1849.  1847 was the beginning of the Potato Blight.  Given that there was such a large number of years between Anne's birth and Edwards, it is quite possible that there were other children who died, perhaps during the Irish famine or perhaps they died in route to the US.   We can find no record of where the O'Conner's may have come from in Ireland but they first show up in the 1850 Census in Newbury, Vermont.   Anne was not listed with them, instead she was found in Walpole, NH.  Anne was next found in 1860 in Rockingham, VT having wed Thomas Lynch.  Thomas Lynch was born in 1830 in Limerick Co. Ireland.

There are no records of a family of O'Conner's arriving by boat in America, perhaps they came in through Canada as during the Famine many families were thrown out of their homes and lands by landlords who packed them off on boats to Canada where the families then made their way to the US.  Chicago and Vermont were common areas where the Irish entered as the states bordered the US.

Reading:  Galloway Bay Mary Pat Kelly http://www.marypatkelly.com/content/index.asp




August 30, 2011

The Civil War and James Leary

James Leary
Great Great Grandfather
m. Mary Murphy
daughter Margaret Leary
married Matthew Patrick O'Neil
daughter Mary O'Neil
married Joseph John Thibault






Regimental History

FIFTY-FIRST REGIMENT
MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEER MILITIA
(INFANTRY) NINE MONTHS
Battles Fought
Fought on 14 Dec 1862 at Kinston, NC.
Fought on 16 Dec 1862 at Whitehall, NC.



The 51st Regt. Mass. Vol. Mil. was raised largely in
southern Worcester County as a part of Massachusetts' quota of
nine months troops. Its rendezvous was Camp Wool, Worcester,
Mass., where the recruits gathered in the early fall of 1862,
Col. George H. Ward of the 15th Mass. Regt., who had lost a
leg at Ball's Bluff, being commandant of the camp. The
companies of the 51st were mustered in between the 25th of
September and the 14th of October. A. B. R. Sprague, an
officer of the 25th Mass. Inf., was commissioned colonel, and
under his command the regiment left Camp Wool, Nov. 25,
1862, proceeding by rail to Boston, where it immediately
embarked on the transport MERRIMAC bound for North Carolina.
After a rough voyage it reached Beaufort, N. C., Nov. 30,
proceeding thence by rail to Newbern. Here it was assigned to
Amory's Brigade. Not until Dec. 5 were arms issued to the
regiment and the men instructed in their use.

On Dec 11, the 51st was assigned to the Goldsboro
expedition. Proceeding with it as far as Beaver Creek Bridge,
it was delayed there to guard the crossing at that
important point. Continuing on after the main body on Sunday
the 14th, it overtook the column Tuesday the 16th while it was
engaged in the battle of Whitehall. During the battle of
Goldsboro, Dec. 17, the 51st guarded the wagon train and was
not in action. It returned to its barracks on the Trent River
near Newbern on Sunday the 21st.

Company "G" was sent to Brice's Ferry, Dec. 30, to do
guard and outpost duty, and there remained during the entire
period of the regiment's service in North Carolina. On
Jany. 17, 1863, seven companies took part in an expedition to
Pollocksville, five of them proceeding as far as Young's Cross
Roads, and having a skirmish with the enemy at White Oak
Creek, returning to Newbern, Jany. 21.

During the month of February the regiment suffered much
from the ravages of disease and especially from an epidemic of
cerebro-spinal meningitis, a number of men dying of the latter
disease. Early in March several companies of the regiment
were distributed at various points along the railroad between
Newbern and Morehead City, while others were stationed at
Beaufort and Evans' Mills, Colonel Sprague being assigned to
the command of the District of Beaufort, which included Fort
Macon. Company " C " became a part of the garrison of this
fort. On May 4, the regiment returned to Newbern much
improved in health, and reoccupied its old camp on the Trent
River.

On June 24, 1863, the 51st was ordered to Fort Monroe.
Arriving at this place on the 27th, it was ordered to report
to General Dix at White House where a force was being
collected to attack Richmond. Arriving at White House, June
28, it was almost immediately ordered back to Fort Monroe.
Here the colonel offered the services of the regiment for
emergency duty until the Confederate army under General Lee
should be driven back from Pennsylvania, and it was
immediately transferred to Baltimore, Md., where it remained
from July 1 to July 6, searching houses for concealed arms,
guarding prisoners from Gettysburg, etc.

On the date last mentioned it was attached to a
provisional brigade under Brig. Genl. H. S. Briggs, the other
regiments being the 8th, 39th, and 46th Massachusetts.
Proceeding to Sandy Hook, Maryland Heights, and Fort Duncan,
opposite Harper's Ferry, it remained at the latter place until
July 12 when it started for Funkstown, Md., in front of the
Confederate position at Williamsport, and here on the
following day it joined the 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac.

The night following its arrival, the Confederate army
recrossed the Potomac. On the 15th the regiment was sent with
the 1st Corps to Berlin, Md., where the Union army was
preparing to cross the Potomac in pursuit of Lee. Here the
51st was detached from the corps and ordered to Massachusetts
for muster out. Arriving at Worcester, Mass., July 21, the men
were furloughed for six days, after which they reassembled and
were mustered out of the service July 27, 1863.

Source: Massachusetts Soldiers, Sailors & Marines in the Civil War


On January 27, 1864 James Leary reinlisted in the Massacusetts 4th Cavalry. Company G.  

4th Regiment Cavalry
Organized at Readville December 26, 1863, to February 8, 1864. 1st Battalion formerly Independent Battalion, Massachusetts Cavalry, was assigned as Companies "I," "K," "L" and "M" February 12, 1864. Attached to Light Brigade, District of Florida, 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. Unattached, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, 10th, 18th and 24th Army Corps, and 25th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to August, 1865. Dept. of Virginia to November, 1865.
SERVICE.--Expedition from Jacksonville, Fla., to Lake City, Fla., February 7-22, 1864. Battle of Olustee, Fla., February 20. McGrath's Creek, Cedar Run, March 1. Cedar Run April 2. Ordered to Bermuda Hundred, Va., arriving there May 8. Operations against Fort Darling April 12-16. Bermuda Hundred May 20-30. Jordan's Crossing and Petersburg June 9. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. At Headquarters, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, June 21 to August 15, 1864. At Headquarters, 10th Army Corps, until December, 1864. Demonstration on north side of the James August 13-20. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Flusser's Mills August 18-19. (Co. "M" detached at Harrison's Landing on outpost duty August 23, 1864, to March, 1865.) Before Petersburg August 24 to September 28. Chaffin's Farm, New Market Heights, September 28-30. Harrison's Landing October 13 (Co. "M"). Fair Oaks October 27-28. Expedition into Charles City and Henrico Counties November 1-5. Duty before Richmond until March, 1865. At Headquarters, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, December, 1864, to April, 1865 (Cos. "I," "L" and "M"). At Headquarters, 24th Army Corps, December, 1864, to April, 1865 (Co. "K"). Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9, 1865. Fall of Petersburg April 2. High Bridge, Farmville, April 6-7. Appomattox Court House April 9, Surrender of Lee and his army. Duty at Richmond until November.
2nd Battalion.--(Cos. "A," "B," "C" and "D.") Sailed from Boston for Hilton Head, S. C, on Steamer "Western Metropolis" March 20, 1864, arriving April 1. Picket and outpost duty at Hilton Head until June. Expedition to Ashepoo River May 22-26 (2 Cos.). 2 Companies moved to Jacksonville, Fla., June 6-8, and duty there until January, 1865, participating in skirmish at Front Creek July 15, 1864. Raid from Jacksonville upon Baldwin July 23-28. Skirmish at South Fork, Black Creek, July 24. St. Mary's Trestle July 26. Raid on Florida Railroad August 15-19. Gainesville August 17. Magnolia October 24. Gum Swamp October 24. 2 Companies on duty at Hilton Head, S.C., June to November, 1864. Expedition to John's Island, S.C., July 2-10. Operations against Battery Pringle July 4-9. Expedition to Boyd's Neck November 29-30. Battle of Honey Hill November 30. Expedition to Deveaux's Neck December !-6. March to Charleston January 15-February 23, 1865. Potter's Expedition to Camden, S. C, April 5-25. Statesburg April 15. Occupation of Camden April 17. Boykin's Mills April 18. Denkin's Mills April 19. Beech Creek, near Statesburg, April 19. Duty in the Dept. of the South until mustered out.
3rd Battalion.--(Cos. "E," "F," "G" and "H.") Sailed from Boston for Hilton Head, S.C., on Steamer "Western Metropolis" April 23, 1864, arriving April 27. Moved to Newport News, Va., May 1-3; thence to City Point May 23, and duty there scouting, picketing and on the fortifications until June 16. Duty at Bermuda Hundred until August 23. Companies "E" and "H" at Headquarters of 18th Army Corps June 16-December 4, and at Headquarters of 25th Army Corps December, 1864, to April, 1865. Company "F" at Headquarters of 24th Army Corps December, 1864, to April, 1865. Company "G" detached at Yorktown and Williamsburg, Va., August 23, 1864, to April, 1865. Occupation of Richmond April 3, 1865 (Cos. "E" and "H"). Company "F" on Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. High Bridge, Farmville, April 6-7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Regiment mustered out November 14, 1865. Discharged at Boston November 26, 1865.
Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 28 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 128 Enlisted men by disease. Total 162.

August 29, 2011

Our German Heritage

Hans August John Gerull was born in 1895 in Memel (Klaipeda) Germany to Fredrich Gerull and Marie Miller (Muller).  Not much is known about Frederich and Marie other than we know they had at least three children.  Johann and Frederich and Heinz.  John Gerull left home sometime before 1917 when he was found to be registered for WWI in Boston, MA.  Again he registered on April 27, 1942 for WWII where it was listed that he was 5'8" and 185 lbs living at 17 Corbett Avenue, Dedham, MA.   He worked for General Sea Foods, Boston, MA.  December 19, 1938 he became a U.S. Citizen dropping Hans August and going by John.

On April 14, 1923 he was listed on a crew change record for the German ship Aval as signing on the ship.  On July 4, 1923 he was recorded on the ship Westphalia arriving from Hamburg.  This was the Westphalia's maiden voyage.  http://www.norwayheritage.com/p_ship.asp?sh=westr.  It left Hamburg on June 21 arriving in New York on July 4. He was listed as Fireman.  On January 21, 1924 he arrived in Boston from Tampico, Mexico aboard the Beacon.

In 1920 he was found living at 14 Dixwell Street, Boston, MA as a boarder with his friend and fellow shipmate Max Plonske and another fellow Ernest Heim.   About 1923 he married Josephine Rose Keefe Baum, widow of Harry Baum.

July 27, 2011

More Witchcraft, Young Love and Banishment Our 9th Great Grand Aunt

PIERRE MORIN dit BOUCHER married MARIE-MADELEINE MARTIN in Acadia about 1661. They probably married at Port-Royal. Pierre was born in Normandy, France, about 1634. His home Parish in France remains unknown. Marie-Madeleine was born about 1642 at Port-Royal, Acadia. She is the daughter of Pierre Martin and Catherine Vigneau and sister of our 9th Great Grandmother Andree Martin wife of Francois Pellerin. 

Pierre was a laborer, and owned 3 cows, 4 sheep, and had 1 arpent of land in cultivation at the time of the 1671 census at Port-Royal. By 1680 they had moved to Beaubassin. He is listed as a tenant of Michel Le Neuf, Sieur de Valliere on 20 March, 1682 at Beaubassin. On the 1686 census at Beaubassin they owned 15 cows, 8 sheep, 12 hogs and had 30 arpents of land. (An English acre is 5/6th of an arpent; 86 arpents equal 100 English acres.) Quite a bit is known of Pierre and Marie and they have an incredible tale. In 1685, Marie-Madeleine was one of the witnesses against Jean Campagna in his trial for Witchcraft at Beaubassin. Her age was given as 43 years. Campagna had been accused by his neighbors at Beaubassin of the crime. Campagna was acquitted and released. Three years after the Witchcraft trial, the Morin family would find themselves on the receiving end of the Law.  (Interesting of note here Andree Martin and Francois Pellerin's daughter married the son of Laurent Godin grandson of none other than our Pierre Godin who also accused Campagna of witchcraft.)  
They were banished from Beaubassin, Acadia in September, 1688. Pierre and Marie-Madeleine had a son Louis who was about 25 years old when he and the daughter of the above-mentioned Michel Le Neuf fell in love. One thing led to another, as it always does, and the 17 year old girl, named Marie-Josephe Le Neuf, was discovered to be pregnant in the Spring of 1688. Marie-Josephe LeNeuf was obviously close to the Morin family. She is named as Godmother on two Baptisms of Morin children.
She was the daughter of an important family -- the Le Neufs considered themselves as such. Louis Morin was the son of a mere laborer. Louis was arrested. His parents and brothers and sisters and two brothers-in-law, their children---19 persons in all---were arrested. They were tried by the local Parish Priest, a Father Trouve. Trouve acted for Le Neuf, who hoped to keep the scandal as quiet as possible; how he hoped he could keep it under wraps in such a small and interconnected community as Beaubassin.
Father Trouve organized everything, including a list of witnesses against all 19 of the conspirators... for that is how they were portrayed. All 19 were judged guilty. The property of all 19 was confiscated; and all 19 were exiled from Beaubassin and Acadia. Their property was awarded to Michel Le Neuf. (Michel Le Neuf tried to confiscate all Pierre Thibodeaus property in 1690. He was not successful with Thibodeau.) Louis Morin was sent to France and sentenced to a lifetime of service in the Royal Navy. He was sent on the ship La Fripone in September of 1688. He is said to have died shortly after.  The priest, Father Trouve, wrote a letter, (which still exists), extolling his own actions as necessary and just. He even suggests that the sentences had been lenient, considering the offense.
Father Trouve felt compelled to justify what he had participated in for he became so unpopular in Beaubassin that he was forced to abandon his Parish. When he attempted to land at Les-Mines, the citizens there refused to let him come ashore. Trouve was forced to continue on to Port-Royal.
Two years later, in October of 1690, Mathieu de Goutin wrote a letter to the Court in France. In this letter, De Goutin wrote that Father Trouve had brought the charges against Louis Morin, had heard witnesses, had pronounced judgment, and had imprisoned Louis Morin and exiled all the others charged. De Goutin charged that Father Trouve had done this despite the fact that Kings Officers had been available. Trouve had obtained an Order that the entire family be exiled on the pretext that one of the brothers-in-law had 'spoken ill' of Father Trouve, and had mentioned the name of the "gentlewoman".
De Goutin tells us that both Trouve, and Michel LeNeuf, were now very unpopular in the colony. He states that Father Trouve had been forced to leave Beaubassin. He further tells us that the Morin family was related to one-third of the habitants of Acadia, and so feelings of anger among the habitants ran deep. When Michel LeNeuf died at sea in 1705, he went unmourned in Acadia. There is evidence that some of the settlers he brought from Trois-Riviers in 1676 left Beaubassin for Quebec soon after 1705. Could they have been compelled to leave by vengeful Acadians?
As for the remaining 18 conspirators; they were sent, impoverished, to Quebec. Pierre Morin died in 1690, about two years after arriving in Quebec. In Quebec the exiles acquired powerful friends for Pierre Morin, Jr. had married Francoise Chiasson, who was also exiled. Francoise Chiasson had a brother, Jean Chiasson, who had settled at Quebec, and who married Marie-Anne Lemoine in 1697. Marie-Anne Lemoine was the cousin of Charles and Jacques Lemoine, and Anne Lemoine, who had married Michel Messier, Sieur de St-Michel. The Lemoines were the most powerful family in Quebec. This family connection may explain a large grant of land, on the Gaspe River, given to Marie Martin in 1697.
Marie Martin disposed of this land grant in September, 1702: "25 September, 1702: Marie Martin, widow of Pierre Martin, in relinquishing a fief "of half league, on either side of the Gaspe River," that had been granted her, about 1697, by Francois de Gallifet, the King's representative at Montreal, declared that her husband had died twelve years previously."
In 1699 Marie Martin was recorded as living in the house of her son Pierre at Mont-Louis, Quebec. She died at Quebec on 16 September, 1714 and was buried the next day. Pierre and Marie-Madeleine Martin had 12 children altogether. They are the parents of 5 sons and 3 daughters who have descendants.
There is no record of what happened to the baby.

July 26, 2011

Witchcraft - The first Witch trial of the Maritimes 1684

Charles Godin dit Bellefontaine, dit Boisjoli who married Marie Melanson was the grandson of Pierre Godin dit Chatillon.  Pierre Godin was born in 1630 in Châtillon-sur-Seine, Cote-d'Or, France.


Pierre Godin dit Châtillon,  son of Claude Godin & Marie Bardin, enlisted to go to Canada on 23 May 1653 in the study of notary LaFousse at La Flèche, Anjou, for the salary of 100 livres per year. He was a master carpenter, and had worked as a journeyman at Châtillon-sur-Seine (arrondissement of Montbard), Burgandy.

On 20 Jun 1653 he acknowledged receiving 127 livres advance wages (notary BELLIOTTE). He arrived in Canada as a member of the "Grande Recrue" on 22 Sep 1653 aboard the "Saint-Nicolas" and was given a land grant by Governor MAISONNEUVE on 2 Feb 1654.


On 27 Sep 1654 a marriage contract was drawn up by notary Lambert Closse, and signed by him, between Pierre and Jeanne 
Rousseliere, daughter of Louis Rousseliere & Isabelle Paris. She was one of the "Filles à Marier." They were married by Father Pierre Pijart, SJ on 14 Oct 1654 at Montréal.
Pierre became a soldier with the 19th squadron of Montréal's "Sainte-Famille" militia in 1663, by which time he and Jeanne had four children. Five more would follow, until 1672.



In that year Pierre Godin and his oldest son Laurent (then age 17) were tried for beating neighbor Pierre Boutonne dit La Ramée, after he had allegedly slapped daughter Catherine (then around 13), claiming she had stolen bread from him. On 30 Aug 1672 Boutonne agreed to pay the costs of pursuing the trial.


In 1675 Pierre was entrusted with the project of building a chapel at Lachine, at which time the family was living near the rapids. Between 7 Jun 1676 and 11 Jun 1677, they immigrated to Port-Royal, Acadia , where Pierre's experience as a carpenter was needed.



On 28 Jun 1685 Pierre sued Jean Campagnard for witchcraft, "claiming that Campagnard cast a spell on him to make Pierre forget threats that he made. The case was not a success for Pierre." He died at Rivière-St-Jean sometime before the 1686 census, which found his wife and three children at Port-Royal, Acadia.


http://www.museeacadien.ca/english/archives/articles/74.htm






July 25, 2011

Our English Ancestors

Pierre Laverdure and his wife Priscilla landed in 1657 after sailing from England with their sons onboard the ship Satisfaction. It is also generally accepted that the family disembarked at St. John's fort at the mouth of the St. John River. The family had sailed to Acadia with the newly appointed English Governor of Acadia, Sir Thomas Temple and a group of other settlers. Pierre and Priscilla, however, were to reside in Acadia for only 10 years.

A Boston court document from 1677 (Priscilla's petition of May 3, 1677) recorded Priscilla's late husband, "Peter Leverdure", as being a Frenchman and a Protestant and "Priscilla Leverdure" as being an Englishwoman. The petition goes on to state that Priscilla's husband had left "[St.] John's fort to escape the wrath of his countrymen Papists". This latter statement clearly suggests that Pierre was a French Huguenot who might have left France as the Catholic government's tolerance for the Protestant Huguenots began to rapidly deteriorate during the 1620's. Either due to the problems unwinding in France or for some other reason, Pierre ended up in England were he and his Priscilla were married about 1630. Ten years before Priscilla's petition the 1667 Treaty of Breda between the English and the French had ceded Acadia back to France. Pierre and Priscilla, both Protestants, were probably unable to fathom the idea of living under a French Catholic government and thus departed for Protestant ruled Boston, Massachusetts, sometime between 1667 and 1770 (Sir Thomas Temple had managed to delay the actual handing over of Acadia to French until 1670).

Two of Pierre's sons went by the Melanson surname, societal logic would dictate that this was their father's surname. However, no record has been found to put the Melanson surname with Pierre senior so perhaps Melanson was Priscilla's surname. Many have suggested that it was Mallinson (or a variation thereof) but there are no records to indicate this in any official sense that would serve to accurately enhance any historical or genealogical research. In an effort to present the most factual data available, most professional researchers and genealogists omit any suggestion of a maiden name for Priscilla from their work. Many spelling variations resembling the Melanson name did exist in England during the 1500's and 1600's but it seems unlikely that Pierre and Charles, both apparently well educated and obviously literate, would go on to consistently misspell their surname when they settled in the New World. This and other details surrounding the origin of the name has gone on to create many theories and possibilities, but it is not known for certain why or from where Pierre and Charles started to use the Melanson surname.

Charles dit La Ramée (Melanson) married Marie Dugas, daughter of Abraham Dugas & Marguerite-Louise Doucet. Charles dit La Ramée and his wife Marie would establish their family near the old Port Royal habitation in the Port Royal basin at what is today known as the Melanson Settlement (sometimes referred to as the "Melanson Village" in old records and maps). The settlement grew quite large over the years with a total of nine households being located on the land during its peak times.

Charles and his wife Marie seem to have done reasonably well as the census' show their cleared land expanding and their livestock increasing. They also had a large section of dyked marshland along the Rivière Daupin (the Annapolis River) adjacent to their property. It was from this dyke that archaeologists recently retrieved two intact aboiteax, one of which is the largest and oldest aboiteau found to date. Other archaeological digs at the Melanson Settlement discovered the foundations of many of the homes and buildings that once stood on the site, including the structure that housed Charles Melanson (son of Charles dit La Ramée) and his wife Anne Bourg.

Marie Melanson daughter of Charles Melanson and Anne Bourg married Charles Godin Boisjoli/Bellefontaine. Their daughter Anne married Pierre Sirois. Marie-Josephe Siros married Vincent Rioux. Basillisse Rioux married Hillaire Thibault. Basillisse and Hillaire were parents of Fabien our great great Grandfather.


For more reading http://www.gregors-gathering.ca/Acadia/Melanson/melansons-intro-gen1.htm

July 21, 2011

June 12, 2011

Old Photographs

Delia Grace Thibault on left
John Coolidge & Arlene Thibault Coolidge


from front steps
Lyda Thibault and husband Joe Conroy
Arlene Thibault, Delia Grace Thibault and husband William Sullivan

June 8, 2011

Where we come from


Our Thibault line began about 1666 in Beaupre across the river from Cap-Saint-Ignance with Francois Louis Thibault.  In 1670 he married at Sainte Anne de Beaupré Elizabeth-Agnes Lefebvre and moved across the river to Cap-Saint-Ignance where he had 13 children.  Jean-Francois was born and married in Cap-Saint-Ignance but sometime during his life he move slightly up river to L'Islet sur-Mer.  It wasn't until Hilaire that the Thibault's found themselves in Trois Pistoles where he met and married Basillisse Rioux.  Fabien was born in St. Simon, Rimouski and died in Baie-des-Sables.  Magloire left Baie-des-Sables for Fall River sometime around 1890.


Sainte Anne de Beaupré

Devotion to Saint Anne, in Canada, goes back to the beginning of New France, and was brought thither by the first settlers and early missionaries. The hardy pioneers soon began to till the fertile soil of the Beaupré hillside; in the region which now forms the parish of Sainte Anne de Beaupré the first houses date from the year 1650. Nor was it long before the settlers built themselves a chapel where they might meet for Divine worship. One of their number, the Sieur Etienne Lessard, offered to give the land required at the spot which the church authorities should find suitable. On 13 March, 1658, therefore, the missionary, Father Vignal, came to choose the site and to bless the foundation of the proposed chapel which, by general consent, was to be dedicated to St. Anne. The very day the Saint showed how favourably she viewed the undertaking by healing Louis Guimont, an inhabitant of Beaupré, who suffered terribly from rheumatism of the loins. Full of confidence in St. Anne, he came forward and placed three stones in the foundations of the new building, whereupon he found himself suddenly and completely cured of his ailment.


Today Sainte Anne de Beaupre is a Catholic Shrine.   More than 1.5 million people make the pilgrimage each year to a complex that includes a major basilica and a museum.

Cape St. Ignatius


Founded in 1672, Cape St. Ignatius is characterized by its rich heritage and fertility of its soil. A tasty way to your fingertips you can discover the delights of the local terroir. Landscaped pedestrian pathways informative sites Small-Cap and the old government dock you provide access to the river that will charm you. Heritage Trail invite you back in time to discover places and historic buildings. Fitted with a three-manual Casavant organ and many architectural treasures, the church also offers a permanent exhibition of religious art. In spring, the rest area invites bird watchers to observe the snow geese and other species. Suggesting a variety of activities, Sugarbush public open their doors for you to discover the secrets of making maple syrup. In the fall, the orchards of West Bellevue area are enchanting sites for pick. Paradise for waterfowl and big game, Cap St. Ignace is, its flats to its large forest areas, a prime destination for hunters.



L'Islet sur Mer

In 1633, Father Lejeune, missionary, landed where a rock formed by the river, "a small Islette (island), the Indians called" Atisaouacanichetagoukhi. History is kept, we can guess why the name ... Country French sailors who were also his naval school, L'Islet-sur-Mer offers a beautiful estate homes with traditional architecture whose lands are caressed by the tides. Among them, two impressive buildings: the church ranked Notre-Dame-du-Bon-Secours and the Maritime Museum of Quebec. In the eastern part of the village, Quay Street leads to a small natural cove that serves as shelter for small boats. All the gentle landscape of the estuary spreads out before our eyes. On the beach during their migration in spring and autumn thousands of snow geese come to offer a grandiose spectacle.


The municipality of Trois-Pistoles (3,739 inhabitants in 2002; 7.74 sq. km) is located on river Saint-Laurent, in the region known as the Basque district (also, administratively, MRC Les Basques). Basque whalers settled the area in the XVIth-XVIIth centuries; they used to cut up whales on a small island located 5 km off Trois-Pistoles, subsequently named Îles aux Basques. Today an ornithological reserve, the island has kept remains of Basque ovens.The Basque heritage is recalled by the "Basque Adventure Park", including the only pelota front wall in Canada.


Trois-Pistoles

In 1621, a Basque ship moored off Trois-Pistoles and sailor landed to resupply in freshwater. An officer lost his tumbler in the river and said: "Three pistols lost." The story is the origin of the name of the river, subsequently given to the village founded in 1693 and incorporated as a municipality on 9 March 1916. "Pistole" was the generic name given to golden coins whose value caried form country to country. The Spanish pistoles (10 pounds) were massively introduced in France after the marriage of Louis XIV with the Spanish Infant Maria- Theresia in 1659.



Rimouski
 
The city was founded by Sir René Lepage de Ste-Claire in 1696. Originally from Ouanne in the Burgundy region, he exchanged property he owned on the Île d'Orléans with Augustin Rouer de la Cardonnière for the Seigneurie of Rimouski, which extended along the St. Lawrence River from the Hâtée River at Le Bic to the Métis River. De la Cardonnière had been the owner of Rimouski since 1688, but had never lived there. René Lepage moved his family to Rimouski, where it held the seigneurie until 1780 when it was gradually sold to the Quebec City businessman Joseph Drapeau.
 
 
Baie-des-Sables
 
Established as a parish in 1869, Baie-des-Sables is renowened for its architectural heritage: the lovely homes, the wharf and the old mill (1838), the rectory (1864) and the impressive steeple of its church, which during the summer season can be visited by the public and offers a local handicraft exhibit.

June 7, 2011

Rebellions of 1837-1838

The Rebellions of 1837 were a pair of Canadian armed uprisings that occurred in 1837 and 1838 in response to frustrations in political reform.  While both were inflamed by economics there were major differences as seen in this article
http://www.politonomist.com/the-1837-1838-rebellions-a-comparison-002463/

A list of those put in prison for these uprisings can be found here http://patriotedurocher.blogspot.com/2011/05/les-patriotes-prisonniers-de-1837-1840.html.  It includes many familiar names including Thibault and Gendron.  Were any of these individuals related to us?  Perhaps, probably even highly likely at least distantly.

The repercussions of the rebellion in Upper Canada were varied, depending on who was caught and when. Samuel Lount and Peter Matthews were both hanged after they were caught trying to escape the country, with a total of 20 people being hanged in connection with the rebellion. There was a price put on Mackenzie’s head of 1,000 pounds, although it was never claimed. In total 885 people were arrested or sought on charges connected to the rebellion, and those found were housed in horrible conditions pending trials. They were jammed together, given little food and some took sick, only for over 600 of them to be acquitted and more than 150 of them to be pardoned. 92 people were sent to penal colonies in Australia. Groups of government supporters, whether official or not, broke into houses, harassing people and stealing property in retaliation for the rebellion. Many people, fearing these reprisals, emigrated to the United States. As many as 25,000 people left, which was a massive drain on the small number of people present in the colony. Despite the small size of the rebellion in Upper Canada the repression of it was very severe, and not at all proportionate to the disturbance it caused.




In the wake of the rebellions in Lower Canada the reprisals were very similar to those in Upper Canada. 500 people were imprisoned following the activities in 1837 and 800 more were captured after the second rebellion in 1838. 66 rebels were exiled to Bermuda and Australia, with 12 being hanged in Montreal. As well, approximately 500 people sought refuge in the United States to evade arrest. Families were obligated to provide accommodation to soldiers free of charge, even as the troops looted and burned the houses of their neighbors who had led or fought in the rebellions. The Constitution Act, 1791 was suspended which resulted in the dismissal of the Assembly, and the army commander who had replaced Governor Gosford after he left the colony ruled by way of an enlarged Legislative Council and decrees. This was how the colony was left until Lord Durham arrived from Britain as both the Governor General of British North America and the President of the Commission of Inquiry on the situation in the North American colonies. Although the rebellions in Lower Canada were far more severe than that in Upper Canada, they were reacted to in a similar fashion and at a similar level, which makes the reaction in Upper Canada seem even more disproportionate.

Books

 Sophie's Rebellion - Beverly Boissery Age 9+
 Sohpie's Exile - Beverly Boissery  Age: 9+

A Deep Sense of Wrong: The Treason, Trials and Transportation to New South Wales of Lower Canadian Rebels After the 1838 Rebellion - Bevery Boisserry

May 30, 2011

Fall River before Magloire and Delia arrived

...in 1884, a Fall River newspaper reported that French Canadian Roman Catholic parishioners had locked their newly-appointed priest out of their church. When the priest finally gained entry to the building, he was confined to the vestry and then threatened with further violence. The priest's "offense"? He was Irish, and the French Canadians would, as one of them proclaimed, "stand on the brink of hell" before they would submit to an Irishman. In this textile-manufacturing city, hard feelings between the more established Irish immigrants and the French Canadian newcomers ran deep, in spite of their shared religion. The quarrel was about ethnicity, class, and politics. In response to their parishioners' rejection of the Irish priest, the bishop closed the French Canadian parish.





Most of the French Canadians who arrived in Massachusetts in the decades after the Civil War came, as the Irish had before them, to escape crushing poverty at home. Quebec had suffered a deep and prolonged agrarian depression in the mid-1800s. By 1880, one-third to one-quarter of all the arable land in Quebec had been abandoned as families found they could not survive on their farms. 25,000 French Canadians sought a new life across the border in New England's booming mill towns.




French Canadians poured into Lowell, Lawrence, Leominster, Gardner, Springfield, North Adams, New Bedford, and Fall River. Those who came to Fall River, which became a center of textile manufacturing with the development of steam power after the Civil War, joined a workforce that was made up predominantly of immigrants from England and Ireland. Many of the English were skilled workers who laid claim to the higher-paying jobs. They were also accustomed to urban life, had a tradition of participating in an organized labor movement, and backed pro-labor Democrats in politics. The Irish, some of whom had acquired textile machinery skills in Lancashire, England, before emigrating, quickly learned to adopt the practices of English militant laborers; they also began to use the city's frequent labor upheavals to build their base in the city's Democratic party. It was all utterly alien to the French Canadians.




The Quebequois who came to Fall River were rural people. They had no experience with factory work, and their poverty gave them little choice but to accept lower wages than those paid to other groups. This earned them the enmity of both the English Protestants and the Irish Catholics. The Canadians were also hostile to labor unions and tended to support the Republican Party. Isolated by language, the Canadians clustered in their own squalid neighborhoods, segregated from the English and Irish. Religion was a refuge; French-speaking priests provided ministry as well as community leadership and social services.


Tensions mounted as the Irish began to play a greater role in Fall River's labor movement and political establishment. Yankees, especially the Republican men who owned and ran the mills and city businesses, had traditionally dominated politics in the city. By 1879, however, one of the candidates for mayor was not only a Democrat but an Irishman. Within five years, Fall River had its first Irish mayor. Despite sharing a religion with the Irish, the French Canadians regarded the Irish as antagonists and did not support the Irish candidate.




Labor protests added to the tension between the French Canadians and Irish Catholics. Organized labor had a long history among British factory workers. When Fall River mill owners recruited skilled English textile workers after the Civil War, they unintentionally imported labor radicalism as well. Throughout the 1870s, immigrant English and Irish textile workers organized a series of labor actions and strikes. The French Canadians did not support the strikes, and in their desperate poverty they frequently took jobs as scabs or "knobsticks," as they were called. The Irish hated the French Canadians for what they saw as betrayal, and violence against "knobsticks" turned deadly.



In August 1884, the French Canadian priest assigned to Notre Dame, the church that served the French Canadians in the Flint Village area of Fall River, died suddenly. Three months later, the Bishop named a new pastor: Father Samuel P. McGee, an Irishman. The French Canadians were outraged. When the new priest arrived to say Mass in mid-December, he found the doors and windows nailed shut; when he managed to get into the building, several of the parishioners held him captive and threatened to kidnap him should he attempt to return to the church. Father McGee fled the pastoral residence and went into hiding. The Canadians collected money to send a delegation to Rome to plead for the appointment of a French-speaking priest.



Tensions grew worse in the following weeks. Fights broke out between those who were willing to accept the new priest and those who insisted on a French pastor. Angry crowds gathered outside the church and disrupted services. Police were dispatched to the church to prevent "sacrilege." By January, the newspapers were reporting near-riots. In one instance, a new choir arrived at the church to find the old choir, which had refused to sing for an Irish priest, threatening violence if the singers took their seats. Angry parishioners followed Father McGee out of the church, abusing and threatening him, and "calling him a d—d Irishman."


On February 13, 1885, the Bishop closed the church and withdrew the priest, explaining that he had "been compelled to this action by the insubordination of some of the flock." The church reopened the next year, under another Irish pastor, and conflict began again. Ethnic tensions between Irish and French Canadians in Fall River did not ease until the end of the century when the arrival of Portuguese, Greeks, Poles, Lithuanians, and Italian immigrants changed the ethnic, political, and social mix of Fall River and other Massachusetts cities.

April 9, 2011

Why some relatives are listed in both the 1900 US Census and the 1901 Canadian Census

Most of our Canadian ancestors were farmers.   They lived primarily in Canada but would come down to the United States in the winter months to earn money, usually working in the mills.  Fall River was one place many Canadians came to.   Our direct ancestors, however, immigrated to the US to work on the railroad while their siblings and cousins continued to reside primarily in Canada farming but also working in the Mills of Fall River and Rhode Island during the winters.

"Most of the French Canadians who arrived in Massachusetts in the decades after the Civil War came, as the Irish had before them, to escape crushing poverty at home. Quebec had suffered a deep and prolonged agrarian depression in the mid-1800s. By 1880, one-third to one-quarter of all the arable land in Quebec had been abandoned as families found they could not survive on their farms. 25,000 French Canadians sought a new life across the border in New England's booming mill towns.


French Canadians poured into Lowell, Lawrence, Leominster, Gardner, Springfield, North Adams, New Bedford, and Fall River. Those who came to Fall River, which became a center of textile manufacturing with the development of steam power after the Civil War, joined a workforce that was made up predominantly of immigrants from England and Ireland. Many of the English were skilled workers who laid claim to the higher-paying jobs. They were also accustomed to urban life, had a tradition of participating in an organized labor movement, and backed pro-labor Democrats in politics. The Irish, some of whom had acquired textile machinery skills in Lancashire, England, before emigrating, quickly learned to adopt the practices of English militant laborers; they also began to use the city's frequent labor upheavals to build their base in the city's Democratic party. It was all utterly alien to the French Canadians.


The Quebequois who came to Fall River were rural people. They had no experience with factory work, and their poverty gave them little choice but to accept lower wages than those paid to other groups. This earned them the enmity of both the English Protestants and the Irish Catholics. The Canadians were also hostile to labor unions and tended to support the Republican Party. Isolated by language, the Canadians clustered in their own squalid neighborhoods, segregated from the English and Irish. Religion was a refuge; French-speaking priests provided ministry as well as community leadership and social services.


Tensions mounted as the Irish began to play a greater role in Fall River's labor movement and political establishment. Yankees, especially the Republican men who owned and ran the mills and city businesses, had traditionally dominated politics in the city. By 1879, however, one of the candidates for mayor was not only a Democrat but an Irishman. Within five years, Fall River had its first Irish mayor. Despite sharing a religion with the Irish, the French Canadians regarded the Irish as antagonists and did not support the Irish candidate.


Labor protests added to the tension between the French Canadians and Irish Catholics. Organized labor had a long history among British factory workers. When Fall River mill owners recruited skilled English textile workers after the Civil War, they unintentionally imported labor radicalism as well. Throughout the 1870s, immigrant English and Irish textile workers organized a series of labor actions and strikes. The French Canadians did not support the strikes, and in their desperate poverty they frequently took jobs as scabs or "knobsticks," as they were called. The Irish hated the French Canadians for what they saw as betrayal, and violence against "knobsticks" turned deadly." http://www.massmoments.org/moment.cfm?mid=360

Interesting, in light of the fact that our Grandfather married an Irish woman.

April 6, 2011

Our Great Grandfather Magloire Thibault

I watched the recent episode of "Who Do You Think You Are" with Gwyneth Paltrow.  In it she discovers the hard life of her great grandmother that led to her not being a very good mother to her grandfather and his siblings.  Her grandmother experienced the death of both her mother and grandfather when she was in college and had to drop out.  Later her oldest daughter was killed by a horse carriage at 3 years old.  It got me to thinking about all the deaths that Magloire experienced.

At eight years old his mother Emilie died.  When he was 16 his stepmother Celine (Miville-Deschenes) died and his father married for the third time.  His father died when Magloire was 32, married, and father of five children including a son, Magloire, who died in infancy.  In 1903 he lost another son, John, in infancy.  In 1919 Magloire lost both his wife Delia and his daughter Laura.  In 1947 and in 1948 he lost his daughter Delia Grace and our grandfather his son Joseph John both to heart disease.  In 1955 his first grand child, Joseph (BooBoo) Darling died.   In 1957 his daughters Lyda and Arlene died.  His son-in-law, Arlene's husband, died of a heart attack shortly before Arlene's death.

Magloire died in 1958 a few months after Arlene passed.  Magloire had a hard life, yet the one picture we know of him from around 1957 show him to be a happy man.  I would have loved to have known him. 

What little we do know of him involves great tragedy and heart ache but he was also a family man.  Both his brother and brother in law lived with him and his family in Dedham.  His first grandchild came to live with him after his daughter Delia Grace remarried.    Later, probably after retirement from the railroad, he went to live with Arlene and her husband John Coolidge. 

March 21, 2011

Funny things discovered on the way to your relatives

Our Great Aunt Arlene married a man in Masschusetts named John Coolidge.  No, he was not that Coolidge, but some thought he was.  Apparently Arlene and John decided to elope.   They went to Porchester, NY and when they gave John's name eyebrows raised and telegraphs were a flutter.   So there went their 15 minutes of fame.


September 26,1927

March 14, 2011

The Photographer

Joseph Thibault son of Charles and Virginie (Boucher) Thibault was born April 23, 1871.  He was the brother of Charles Onesime Thibault founder owner editor and publisher of "L'Independent," a weekly news-paper printed in the French language.  Joseph married Adele Berube on October 28, 1889.  They had 2 children Adele and Albert.  Albert died in 1900 at the age of 4.  Adele we can find no record and she wasn't listed in the 1900 census with Albert so it is assumed she died prior to 1900.

Joseph and Adele lived in Fall River until at least 1920 when they were listed on the Census as living at 1510 Highland Street.  They owned the house at this time.  Joseph ran his photography business originally from Pleasant Street, Fall River and later from 154 South Main Street until his death in 1926.  In between he had what appeared to be temporary South Main Street addresses.


Joseph and Charles Onesime were 4th Cousins once removed from Magloire.   We don't have a photo of our Photographer but we do find one of his brother Onesime.  It was probably taken by Joseph.

March 11, 2011

Old Photographs

Often one comes upon old photographs in boxes or from relatives where the identity of the party in the picture is not known.  Guesses can be made about who is in the picture but verification is difficult.  I came across one such picture from a cousin who's family always thought that this was a wedding  photograph of Maglore Thibault and Delia Beaulieu.  It may be, but it also maybe a photograph of Victoria Thibault (Magloire's first cousin) and her husband Joseph Caron.  I'm posting this in hopes that perhaps someone will come across it and know for sure or know at least that it is NOT Victoria and Joseph Caron.



Mystery solved.  This is the wedding photo of Magloire and Delia Beaulieu.  It was, as far as I know, taken by a photographer Joseph Thibault.  Joseph was married to a Mary Adele Berube.  Joseph and Mary had one son Albert who died at 4 in 1890.  They didn't have any more children but were still in Fall River as of 1920.


I am with about a 99.9% certainty that this is Magoire and Delia.  There is no other reason for the family to have this photograph plus Delia resembles my sister and I see my brother in Magloire's eyes.  

February 19, 2011

Miville dit Le Suisse

Jacques Miville still lived with his parents in 1667 at the age of 27 and was believed to be a "coureur des bois" making a living off the fur trade. For example, in January 1684, he buys goods from Jean Maheux, a merchant in Quebec City, and promises to pay him in the springtime"when he gets back from his trip." In October 1669, he married Catherine de Baillon, daughter of the late Alphonse de Baillon and Lady Louise de Marle, who had been provided with a large dowry. The wedding was attended by numerous personalities including Mssrs Daniel de Rémy Chevalier Seigneur de Courcelles and Louis Rouer Sieur de Villeray. To our knowledge, the marriage contract is the first document in which Jacques Miville, the groom, is identified as "Sieur desChesnes". We can not explain why Jacques has this title, which would become the Deschênes surname of many of his descendants.



A short while after the signing of the wedding contract, Jacques hired two men to cut down trees on his concession of land located in grande Anse au Cap Martin. In the spring of 1670, he performs "navigation and every day work." During the 1670's he carries out fur trade: in 1677, he is known to promise payments in the form of beaver skins. However, he also buys property, and this gives the impression that he wants to work the land. In June 1674, he buys property from Sieur de La Bouteillerie, Lord of Rivière-Ouelle, a domain measuring 12 acres in width to the Saint-Jean River, a short distance west of Rivière-Ouelle, and what is today in Pocatiere. This concession of land was situated in an area fought over by the Lord of La Pocatiere and the Lord of Rivière-Ouelle. In the end Jacques is guaranteed ownership by the lady of La Pocatiere. He settles on this land before 1675, this is evident since his daughter Marie is born in Rivière Saint-Jean, not in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, as mentioned in Jette's dictionary. In 1676, he sells this property and buys another one in Riviere-Ouelle, where he lives for seven more years.

In 1684, he comes back to Rivière Saint-Jean to work as a farmer on his former property now owned by Charles Aubert de la Chesnaye, one of the richest notables in Nouvelle-France.

Jacques Miville died in Rivière-Ouelle Saint-Jean on January 27th, 1688: he was only 49. His wife died the very same day. He was buried the next day and Catherine, his wife, the following day. These simultaneous deaths are still unexplained. He was the father of six children aged from 6 to 17. Francois, his brother comes and settles in Riviere Saint-Jean, and becomes the guardian of his, Jacques children. Francois has ten children of his own, ages 2 to 20, all of them born in Lauzon between 1663 and 1686. He pays for the farm lease from 1689 to 1693 at which time he gets married to Jeanne Sauvenier, his second wife and her third husband, and moves to Rivière-Ouelle where he dies in 1711 at the age of 77.  Jeanne Sauvenier(Savonnet) brought to the marriage 10 children between the ages of 4 and 21.  Francois and Jeanne have one more child.  This was one huge family.

February 15, 2011

Metis found

Basile H. Beaulieu (son of Nicolas Basile Hudon Beaulieu and Josette Miville) came from Montreal, P. Q. Canada with his brother Paul to Lac-du-Flambeau, Wisconsin about 1804. Voyageur with the North West Fur Company, 1804-1805, Flambeau, Minnesota. Basile and his brother Paul managed the Fur Trading Post at Lac-du-Flambeau, WI. In 1818 Basile is listed among the "Roster of Employees" of the American Fur Company.

Basile (Bazile) was listed by the North West Fur Company in 1805 in the Lac du Flambeau department with one year to serve on his contract and a credit of 16 livre on his account. He was hired by the Michilimackinac Company on 9 July 1810 to winter at Lac du Flambeau for 700 livre.(p. 33)19 The town of Beaulieu, Mahnomen County, Minnesota was named after the descendants of Basile and his Ojiway wife.

Basile H. Beaulieu married in 1810 in Wisconsin an Indian Maiden named O-Ge-mau-gee-shi-go-qua, which means Queen of the Skies, but was called Marguerite Beaulieu. (She was the daughter of the Indian Chief, White Raven.) It is believed that Basile H. Beaulieu died in 1838 and is buried in the Beaulieu burial grounds at La Pointe, Madeleine Island, Wisconsin.

Paul married an Indian Maiden named Wau-Ne-Aush-E-Quay.

Basile and Paul are not direct decendants of ours but they share common ancestors Nicholas Hudon Beaulieu and Marie Madeleine Bouchard.  So there is the Indian dad claimed was in our family. 

January 22, 2011

Delia Beaulieu Thibault's Siblings

Delia Beaulieu (1872-1919), daughter of Amable and Georgina (Beaupre) Beaulieu had nine siblings, four brothers and five sisters.  We know a little more about four of them.

Pierre Beaulieu (1871-?).  Pierre married late in life (31) to a much older woman.  Her name was Marie Rosa Scarbeau and she was 48.  There were, obviously, no children to this marriage.


Madeleine Beaulieu

Omer Beaulieu (1878-?).  According to the 1900 Census Omer lived with his sister Delia and her family in Dedham, MA.  He was listed as being 20, having immigrated in 1898.  This could have been a language problem and 20 was the age he was when he came to the US. Omer married Sedulie Lavoie in 1905 in Quebec.  They had two children we know about.   One was Madeleine Beaulieu. She died at age 91 in 2008.  Madeleine married Cyrice Berube.  They had one daughter we could find, Clairmance Berube.  Clairmance married Daniel d'Astous and they had 3 children.  Dany, Danick, and Marie-HeleneMarie-Helene d'Astous married James Pelletier and had one son Jacob Pelletier. Danick married Genieve Blanchette,


Omer had one other child we know about, Clovis-Alphone Beaulieu.  Clovis-Alphone was born in 1919 and died in 1980.  Clovis married Gisele d'Astous (relation to Clairmance's husband unknown).   They had eight children;Georgette (married Normad Berger), Ferndinand (married Sylvie Théberge), Melita, Anonomye(1) (Oct. 10, 1950-Oct. 12, 1950), Gaston (married Columbe Gagnon), Anonomye(2) (April 27, 1953-April 28, 1953) Roger and  Isabelle.  It is Melita Beaulieu we know more about.  Melita married Armond d'Astous (relationship unknown) and had two children Sarah d'Astous and Sabastien d'Astous.




Elise Beaulieu (1890-1977)  Elise married a Leon Martin and had one child we know about.  Benoit Martin.   Benoit married Orise Rioux and had five children.  Carol Martin married Lyne Palmondon but we find no record of children.  Christine Martin married Dany Belzile and have three sons; Benoit-Alexa Belzile, Jean-Francois Belzile, and Pierre-Luc BelzileTherese Martin married Daniel Thibault (relationship not known).  Daniel was a widower and had two daughters Amelie and Noemie.  Therese and Daniel had another daughter Emma Thibault. Sylvain Martin married Johanne Garard and had two children Anne-Sophie Martin and Louis-David MartinBernard Martin was born October 5, 1955 and died January 25, 1956.



Marie Beaulieu (1883-?) - Marie married Joseph Gagnon in Nov. 18, 1901 in Rimouski.  They had 5 children Luce Gagnon married Hormidas Proulx, Rose de-Lima Gagnon married Octave Proulx, Joseph married Gabrielle Lavoie, Georgiane Gagnon married Isadore Thibault (yes he is a distant cousin of Magloire through Jean-Francois Thibault and Angelique Proulx), and an unknown son who married Madeleine Bernier.


Generations:

Grandparents Generation
Parents Generation
Kids Generation
Grandkids Generation

January 21, 2011

Children of Amable Beaulieu and Georgina Beaupre

  • Pierre Armand Beaulieu 1871 –
  • Delia Victoria Beaulieu 1872 – 1919
  • Rose De Lima Beaulieu 1876 –
  • Omer Beaulieu 1878 –
  • Marie Beaulieu 1883
  • Lydia Beaulieu 1884 –
  • Louis Amable Beaulieu 1885 – 1886
  • Joseph Amable Beaulieu 1887 – 1887
  • Delvina Alphonsine Beaulieu 1888 –
  • Elise Beaulieu 1890 – 1977
  • Claudia Beaulieu 1893 –

January 5, 2011

Eighth Generation Aunt

Fabien Thibault's oldest sister was Desanges Thibault.  Desanges was born 21 Mar 1830 in Trois-Pistoles.  She died on 26 Feb 1897 in Baie-des-Sables. 

Desanges married Louis Dion son of Jean-Baptiste Dion and Louise Lucie Harvey on 4 May 1857 in St-Fabien, Rimouski.  They had the following children:

  1. Desanges Dion was born in Mar 1858 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She died on 2 Jun 1858 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She was buried 1 on 4 Jun 1858 in St-Fabien, Rimouski.  
  2. Charles Dion. Charles married 1 Ursule Dutremble-Desrosiers daughter of Théotime Dutremble-Desrosiers and Rosalie Ruest on 12 Oct 1880 in Baie-des-Sables, Matane.  
  3. Claire Dion. Claire married 1 Zéphirin Lévesque son of Augustin Lévesque and Elmire Rioux on 10 Apr 1883 in Baie-des-Sables, Matane.  
  4. Elmire Dion was born in Feb 1861 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She died on 18 Mar 1861 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She was buried 1 on 20 Mar 1861 in St-Fabien, Rimouski.  
  5. Clarina Dion was born in Apr 1862 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She died on 14 Sep 1862 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. She was buried 1 on 16 Sep 1862 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. 
  6. Magloire Dion. Magloire married Célina Mignault daughter of François-Xavier Mignault and Emlie Charette on 13 Sep 1887 in St-Octave, Mont-Joli.  
  7. Louis Dion was born in Apr 1864 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. He died on 9 May 1864 in St-Fabien, Rimouski. He was buried 1 on 11 May 1864 in St-Fabien, Rimouski.  
  8. Apolline Dion. Apolline married 1 Joseph Migneault son of Joseph Mignault and Delvina Fournier on 3 May 1886 in Baie-des-Sables, Matane. 
  9.  Joseph Dion. Joseph married 1 Alzire Paquet daughter of Antoine Paquet and Constance Aubé on 16 Nov 1891 in Ste-Thérèse-d'Avilla, Ste-Thérèse.